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Thread: HPA tanks in the rain

      
   
  1. #1
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    HPA tanks in the rain

    So awhile back I was at my local field and it looked like it was going to rain so I was going to have my ninja tank filled one more time before we had to stop playing. The guy that was working there told me that he couldn't fill it because he didn't want to get water in my tank, as it was starting to rain at this point. At first I didn't think much of it but now I'm wondering, how much water if any would get into the tank and would this effect operation or be unsafe to use the tank, if filled in the rain?

  2. #2
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    Water does not compress so it would be fine I think for a drop or so. They don't have a covered fill station? If having to fill in the rain, I would just keep the fill nipple pointed down and attach the hose up from the bottom to keep water from getting in.

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    They compressor is under a shed were they do all the business. He told me that their compressed pulls in air from around it and compresses it into the tank so the moisture would get in it. I didn't want to question him since it started really raining but I figured all compressors worked in a similar fashion and if this were true anytime you filled you would always get some water in the tank.

  4. #4
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    Any good compressor should have a system to remove the water. There is moisture in the air already, the air in your tank has some, a little more should not hurt it. In any case, I hope they don't fill directly off the compressor and instead have bulk HPA tanks that do the filling.

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    That's what I thought. And Im not sure how they do they filling exactly, I've seen the compressed in the back and it looks like there is a hose that comes off to do the filling but I haven't been close enough to it so see for sure.

  6. #6
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    WATER
    Water is in the air, so its in your compressed air. Depending on the temperature & humidity there will be either a lot or a little water, but there will always be water.

    STAGE TWO: Water Separator.
    The next stage of water separation should be a mechanical separator - looks like an in-line air filter. What it does is directs the incoming air in a spiral and uses centrifugal force to separate out the water in the compressed air. Depending on the temperature of the air, this process should remove between 40% and 60% of the water in the compressed air.
    At this point the air may be dry enough for your operation. Install point-of-use filters with auto-drains at each station to catch the last remnants of water and dirt in the air lines before it reaches your tools.

    STAGE THREE: Refrigerated Air Dryer.
    The next stage is to cool the air coming from the compressor. Why cool the air? Because cold air can't hold water. The colder the air the less water it holds. That is why the industry talks about the dew point. Dew point is the temperature of the air. There is a direct relationship between the temperature, pressure, and the moisture content of the air.
    A refrigerated air dryer cools the air down to 3C. It is basically a refrigerated coil mated with the air line. This removes the heat from the air line and cools the air in it. The water is diverted by gravity and removed with an electronic auto-drain. A pre-filter should be placed before the air dryer to protect it.

    STAGE FOUR: Desiccant Bead Air Dryer.
    This stage of air drying takes the dew point down to -40C. This is very dry and is needed for painting, printing, and instruments. The beads physically absorb the water in the compressed air, so the air must be relatively dry before entering or the beads will become loaded up with moisture very quickly and stop working. There is a moisture indicator on the front of this unit when it turns colour the desiccant beads need to be changed (should be 1 year or more). As you can see there are two air filters that come before the bead chamber - The first air filter takes out 5 micron, and bigger, particles and the other filter takes out any oil vapour and particles down to 0.01 microns. This level of filtration is necessary because if the beads get contaminated with dust or oil they will not absord water and will prematurely fail.
    "Money can't buy back your youth when your old, a friend when your lonely or a love that's grown cold"
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  7. #7
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    A littl eater is not harmful for a short amount of time but if allowed to sit it can cause corrosion and break down the orings nd other parts in a reg.
    pit is also very bad for a the bottle. As the moisture drys it leaves behind residue and this is what causes problems.
    Ninja Paintball

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  8. #8
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    Hooligan thanks for letting me know how the compressers work. I'm assuming any decent one will have a similar operation.

    As for water that would potentially get in the tank what is the best way to remove it? All my tanks are ninja brand.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reaper View Post
    I'm assuming any decent one will have a similar operation.
    Yes, our compressor works in such a way that we vent out the moisture while it's running - all legit compressors should be equipped with either manual or automatic methods of doing this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lemi Died View Post
    *nods sagely* yes, the face slide is a fantastic way to minimize your profile, as it attempts to fold your spine in 47 different locations. Old kung Fu masters called this "slinkie style", and current American historians refer to it as the Accordion. Whereas we rednecks just refer it it as "hey ya'll, watch this!"

  10. #10
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    interesting, I never knew any of this. Good stuffs!
    Current markers: Not as many as teh Calgar

  11. #11
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    I didn't know this either! Wow... thanks.
    All out till fallout.

  12. #12
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    "Now I know!"
    "And knowing is half the battle!"


    All kidding aside, I always wondered how they keep moisture from getting in.
    Who says paintball isn't educational?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan View Post
    "We fixed the super crappy - always leaking macro fittings! Now... your gun will just leak from inside your grip frame/gun... in a horrifying manner. Is it my solenoid? Is it the simple o-ring? Is it... something more dastardly? I don't know!!!!"

  13. #13
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    ^^Indeed, Winter. I just tried to justify my students coming to this Sunday's game because they'd learn physics
    All out till fallout.

  14. #14
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    Well i am planning on going out this Saturday to a big game and there's a chance of rain, so ill let you guys if any water gets in my tanks, hopefully none does.

  15. #15
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    Well turns out it didn't rain this weeked so no water made it to the tank.

  16. #16
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    I have never had a problem with my HPA tanks and rain. The chances of actually getting enough water into your tank to do any serious damage seems pretty slim. I have done it all. From dropping (more like falling) into streams when crossing them, to getting caught out in an open field in an intense sudden downpour. Never had a bad thing happen to any of my ninjas. Just wipe your fill nipple with a dry clean cloth and fill it up.

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